Breech Pregnancy Demystified
13th May 2014 by Paul 

“Your baby is breech.” This is one of the last things any woman wants to hear. It used to mean a difficult and dangerous birth, bottom first, like pushing your Christmas tree out the door the wrong way. Now it means dangerous surgery, which can have negative outcomes for both mom and baby.

Delivery by Cesarean (or C-section) consists of major abdominal surgery, cutting through the wall of the mother’s abdomen to deliver the baby. Statistics also show that C-section babies have much higher rates of bronchial asthma, scoliosis, and cerebral palsy, to name a few.

Breech Pregnancy Variations

Structure governs function. Without exception, the breech baby is adapting to a structural problem of the mother. In this case, misalignment of her spine and pelvis is causing pressure and constraint on the uterus, preventing the baby from assuming the head down position prior to birth. Dr. Larry Webster, the grandfather of chiropractic pediatrics, developed the Webster In-Utero Constraint Technique. This technique is a very light pressure adjustment on the mother’s abdominal wall and lower spine, and has been shown to correct breech presentation by 90% of the time.

As a chiropractor, I have been particularly blessed. First, in the year before he died, I had the privilege to learn this technique from Dr. Webster himself. And second, in 20 years of practice, I have never failed with use of this technique, even in women with previous c-section births. The structural diagnostic testing to determine if a woman is a candidate for the Webster In-Utero Constraint procedure takes only minutes, is completely non-invasive, and can create a positive change in your pregnancy and delivery of your baby.

If you’re interested in contacting me to learn more about my knowledge and experience in this area please do so here.

Leave a Reply

NAVIGATION

Contact

1111 Princes Street

Kingston, ON K7L2T1


Dr. Givens

613-542-5802

docgiven.getwellstaywell@gmail.com


Dr. Cook

613-549-7977

clc@kingston.net